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Plants to Attract

How to Attract Hummingbirds & Butterflies

How to Attract Hummingbirds and Butterflies, by Ortho BooksHummingbirds and butterflies add interest, beauty, and enjoyment to a garden.

This book describes the characteristics, behavior, and needs of these creatures.

Plant-selection lists and necessary garden design elements are included, as are descriptions of the most common hummingbird and butterfly species.

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Attracting Hummingbirds, Keeping Them Healthy and Happy

Attracting hummingbirds to your lawn, garden or patio is not too hard. Hang a red hummingbird feeder filled with sugar nectar in an open area that is easily accessible or them and safe from predators. If there are hummingbirds in your area, eventually they will find it.

Getting hummingbirds to stay around and getting migrating hummers to return year after year, however, takes a little more effort. If you want them to nest in your yard, you need suitable trees and a good population of spiders. That means you cannot spray with pesticides.

In certain parts of the country, especially in humid, forested areas near lakes and streams, spiders are considered pests. People install misting systems to keep spiders away from their houses and porches so that they will not clutter up the place with webs.

Spraying for spiders can be counterproductive for two reasons: Spiders eat flies, mosquitoes, and other flying pests, and hummingbirds eat spiders. In fact, spiders are the hummingbirds’ main food source.

So if you kill off the spider population near your house, your yard becomes less attractive to nesting hummingbirds. The spray may also be bad for the tiny birds. Do not spray for mosquitoes or wasps either.

Planting red, trumpet-shaped, nectar-bearing flowers also attracts hummingbirds. If you do that, be sure to plant them where you will be able to easily see the hummingbirds to come to drink from them. It can be a beautiful sight.

In dry areas, or during dry summers, lawn sprinklers help the flowers and provide drops of water on leaves for the hummingbirds. To save water in dry areas while maintaining lush flowers and foliage for the hummers, a drip irrigation system is efficient and economical.

So if you want crowds of hummingbirds around your feeders, and you want the chance of seeing a nest of baby hummers in your yard, be kind to spiders, plant the right flowers and plants, hang red hummingbird feeders (and keep them clean and filled with fresh nectar)—and irrigate for lush vegetation.

Then just sit back and watch the show.

Give the Gift of Hummingbirds

Hummingbirds enchant most people. Almost everyone would like to attract hummingbirds to their yard, patio, or balcony. But many do not know how.

You could give them a book, of course. But if you know someone who would like to attract hummingbirds, you could give them something special to attract hummingbirds to them. Give them a plant gift like beautifully scented white viburnum or a gorgeous Korean lilac tree.

Of course, hummingbirds are native only to the Americas. But even outside the Americas, the exquisite tube-shaped flowers of viburnum or lilac are still great for attracting butterflies.

Plants make beautiful, showy gifts. Even if your offering never makes it outdoors, the recipient will love your thoughtfulness and enjoy the life and beauty that plants bring to the indoors.

You can purchase a plant online and have it delivered with a money-back guarantee. As the holidays approach, the idea of not having to brave the crowds or the inclement weather looks more and more appealing. Just order a plant on line.

Of course, there is a wonderful selection of plants to order on line. I like the high quality and lovely selection at SerenataPlants.com, where you can find house plants, topiary, flowering plants, palms, trees, and even topiary frames in whimsical shapes.

At this time of year, when everyone scurries around seeking last-minute (often ill-chosen) gifts, here is an easy way to make a good impression and give pleasure that lasts for months or years. Beautiful plants can really brighten people’s lives, especially during the dark days of winter.

If you are not sure that the recipient will know how to care for the plant you are sending them, you can send them a link to this plant care guide or even download and print it to mail to them.

 

A Guide to Hummingbird Food

hummingbird

HUMMINGBIRD FEEDING Image by birdfarm via Flickr

These amazing little birds astound with their miniscule measurement and lightning-fast wing beats. An average hummingbird is only a handful of inches very long, a lot less than an ounce in excess weight, and can beat its wings as fast as sixty miles per hour when in dive or escape mode.

Although there are a wide range of hummingbird species, the most extensively recognized is probably the ruby-throated assortment. If you want to bring humming birds to your yard or garden, you’ll need some humming bird food.

The most purely natural and wonderful way to entice and feed hummingbirds is by planting a hummingbird backyard. Hummingbird gardens not only draw in hummingbirds, but butterflies as nicely, due to the fact they each like nectar.

When choosing flowers, vegetation and shrubs for your garden, look for red or bright pink colours and trumpet shapes. Red Columbine, Butterfly Bush, Early morning Glory, Bee Balm, Rose of Sharon, Honeysuckle and Azalea are just a handful of examples of botanicals that hummingbirds adore. (more…)

Attracting Hummingbirds With Lovely Plants, Low-Cost Hummingbird Feeders

Photo of Bee Balm Plant (Monarda)

BEE BALM PLANT (MONARDA) Image via Wikipedia

You’re guaranteed to come across a single that is great for your new garden! You can find additional facts about bee balm at NewGardener.com.

Gardenview Scarlet Monarda — The Monarda ‘Gardenview Scarlet’, Monarda didyma, also identified as Bee Balm, Bergamont, Horsemint, Oswego Tea, is a clump-forming perennial that has tubular, two-lipped, red rose flowers with dark green aromatic foliage.

‘Gardenview Scarlet’ stands at 3′ higher and has a plant distribute of 24-30″ and blooms from July to August. If deadheaded, (remove aged flowers from plant) more time bloom times will be encouraged. Monarda requires to be planted in complete sun, but will tolerate afternoon shade.

Grandview Scarlets are ideal grown in loaded soil in a very well-drained place, not getting authorized to dry out. The leaves of Monarda can be applied for teas and in salads. Attracting hummingbirds, butterflies and bees, especially when massed, Monarda gives you color and contrast for the perennial border, wild garden, meadow, and herb garden or along ponds or streams.

Petite Delight Monarda — The Monarda ‘Petite Delight’, Monarda didyma, also recognized as Bee Balm, Bergamont, Horsemint, Oswego Tea, is a clump-forming perennial that has tubular, two-lipped, light red to purple flowers with dark green aromatic foliage.

Petite Wonder Monarda — The Monarda ‘Petite Wonder’, Monarda didyma, also recognized as Bee Balm, Bergamont, Horsemint, Oswego Tea, is a clump-forming perennial that has tubular, two-lipped, light pink flowers with dark green aromatic foliage. (more…)

Attracting Birds to a Tropical Garden

Some individuals enjoy bird watching but prefer to do their bird watching in their back yard. Below is some advice on attracting wild birds to your back yard.

Firstly it depends upon having wild birds in the general area where your house is located and then you can attract then to your backyard. The method used to attract the birds will depend upon what is the diet of the bird.

If the bird is a nectar feeder e.g. bananaquits or hummingbirds, then large flowering plants will attract them. Hummingbird bills are perfectly adapted to the various types of flowers that they feed on, so different types of flowers will attract different hummingbirds.

Some hummingbirds have especially curved or elongated bills that allow them to feed on special flowers, eg the White-tipped Sicklebill hummingbird whose downward curving bill allows it to draw nectar from heliconias. The Ruby-Topaz Hummingbird has a short and slightly decurved bill that is suited to feeding on the flowers of the ixora shrub.

The Blue-tailed Emerald has a short bill that is suited for feeding on the Hibiscus flower. The Copper-rumped Hummingbird has a straight long bill that allows it to feed on medium sized tube shaped flowers such as the allamanda. (more…)

Five Steps to Happy Hummers

Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubri...

RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD (ARCHILOCHUS COLUBRIS), MALE, CAP TOURMENTE NATIONAL WILDLIFE AREA, QUEBEC, CANADA Image via Wikipedia

1. Get the Right Kind of Feeder.

Saucer type feeders with perches and ant motes are preferred.

I have been using saucer type feeders almost exclusively for years. I feel the birds prefer them to the tube type and they are generally much easier to clean.

Birds like to perch, rest, catch tiny bugs and survey their territory at the feeders. Sitting and resting during feeding saves precious energy and helps young birds to socialize. The flat feeders also give the little guys a much better view of their spread.

I have learned the hard way that yellow flowers on feeders are unnecessary. They not only attract ants and bees, they can become brittle and break. The extra pieces also make the feeder harder to clean.

I recommend the HummZinger by Aspects which is basically only two pieces. It is attractive, drip resistant, easy to clean and has a deeper well which deters bees and wasps.

This is a sketch of my Fancy Hummzinger from my Drawing Everyday Blog. (more…)

How to Make Hummingbird Foodstuff at Household

Green Violet-ear -- Finca Lerida, Boquete, Panama.

GREEN VIOLET-EAR -- FINCA LERIDA, BOQUETE, PANAMA. Image via Wikipedia

It’s spring at last, and here in Southern Colorado, it appears we’ve been waiting a extensive time to glimpse our favored wild chook, the hummingbird. We just enjoy viewing these small, lithe creatures of this kind of vivid colour outdoors our window.

There have been a couple summers right here that we’ve had twenty distinct hummingbirds at our three feeders. We acquired to refill them each and every day just to retain up!

We’re fortunate to have quite beneficial soil in our garden, whereas most of this component of the country is poor, rocky soil. This can make rising perennials much easier and much more bountiful. I say simpler mainly because we are in a excessive-desert local weather and ought to water supply always to continue to keep items green. (more…)

Create a Butterfly and Hummingbird Garden

Close-up photo of purple Buddleia flowers.

Image via Wikipedia

Creating a Butterfly and Hummingbird Garden
Word Count:
384
Summary:
With just a little bit of planning, you can have beautiful butterflies and hummingbirds flocking to your garden. That’s good news for gardeners because not only are these winged creatures fun to watch, they’re essential pollinators.
Keywords:
Creating a Butterfly and Hummingbird Garden
Article Body:
With just a little bit of planning, you can have beautiful butterflies and hummingbirds flocking to your garden. That’s good news for gardeners because not only are these winged creatures fun to watch, they’re essential pollinators.
The key is to know what hummingbirds and butterflies look for, which is flowers with nectar. So when you select nectar-rich plants for your garden, look for varieties that are both prolific bloomers and have a long bloom time. Prune your plants to prevent excessive woody growth and encourage the growth of new flowers.
Try these tips from Monrovia, one of the leading growers of plants:
• Hummingbirds are attracted to bright orange, red and hot pink blossoms. Their long, narrow beaks can reach the nectar of long, tubular flowers such as the Balboa Sunset Trumpet Vine with its large scarlet blossoms, and the Goldflame Honeysuckle, which has vibrant yellow and red flowers. Other good choices are the Super Red Flowering Maple and the Navajo series of Salvia, available in many colors, including bright red, rose and salmon red.
• Not all hummingbirds feed at the same height, so plant an array of shrub sizes and climbing vines for food sources.
• Butterflies are attracted to yellow, orange and red. They too are seeking nectar, but their mouths, or proboscises, are much smaller, so they prefer flatter flowers they can perch on while they feed. The no-fail plant for butterflies is the Butterfly Bush, or Buddleja. However, since they can get too large for some gardens, consider the Petite series of Dwarf Butterfly Bushes. Petite Indigo has a profusion of lilac-blue flowers; Petite Plum sports reddish-purple blooms and the Petite Snow has pure white blossoms.
• Lilacs are favorites of butterflies, but don’t typically flower well in climates with warmer winters. The Blue Skies Lilac produces huge clusters of light lavender-blue flowers that don’t require winter chilling. Butterflies love Coneflowers, such as the bright pink Pixie Meadowbrite. Asters are great because they bloom well into fall. The new Farmington Aster has a profusion of lilac bloom clusters that butterflies flock to.
• Supply a source of water. Hummingbirds enjoy flying through a fine mist, which cools them off. Butterflies like drinking from shallow puddles. Position some large flat rocks in a sunny spot, on which butterflies can sun themselves to warm their wings.

With just a little bit of planning, you can have beautiful butterflies and hummingbirds flocking to your garden. That’s good news for gardeners because not only are these winged creatures fun to watch, they’re essential pollinators.

The key is to know what hummingbirds and butterflies look for, which is flowers with nectar. So when you select nectar-rich plants for your garden, look for varieties that are both prolific bloomers and have a long bloom time.

Prune your plants to prevent excessive woody growth and encourage the growth of new flowers.

Try these tips from Monrovia, one of the leading growers of plants: (more…)

Tips for Turning Your Backyard Into a Hummingbird Habitat

http://www.public-domain-image.com (public domain image)Author: Steve Peek

Hummingbirds notoriously have a high wing-beat rate, and it is its fast wing-beat rate that generates the hum for which the hummingbird is named.

High Metabolism Rate

The largest of hummingbirds, the Giant Hummingbird (Patagona gigas), grow to be about 24g and have an average wing-beat rate of 8-10 beats per second.

Mid-sized hummingbirds, the Rufous Hummingbird (Selasphorus rufus), grow to weigh about 3g and beat their wings at a rate of 20-25 beats per second.

The smallest species of hummingbirds, the Bee Hummingbird (Mellisuga helenae), only grow to approximately 1.8g, and yet they beat their wings at about 70 beats per second.

One might wonder how a hummingbird could generate such an incredibly fast wing-beat rate, but this kind of metabolism is very similar to the energy derived by giving a three-year-old child a can of Mountain Dew to drink. The high sugar-intake taken by the child creates a situation where the child seems to bounce off the walls. Well, the same thing happens with the hummingbird too.

(more…)